Patrick Hall

With an art practice now spanning several decades, Patrick Hall has firmly established a reputation for uniquely intricate and idiosyncratic works.  Patrick’s ability to cross and often combine seemingly disparate art genres sees a distinct and elegant collision of beautifully fabricated imaginings with prose poetry, cabinetry, lighting and sound recordings. These often emotive pieces are rich in story-telling, sometimes autobiographical, sometimes not.  As long time friend and internationally recognised Tasmanian writer Richard Flanagan describes, “like a great novel or painting, Pat Hall’s work invites us to endlessly return, revealing ever more layers and depths.”

Patrick’s work has appeared in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout Tasmania and the Australian mainland.  In the United States of America, Patrick’s work has featured at Sculpture, Objects, Functional Art [SOFA] in Chicago and New York City.  At SOFA Chicago ’01 Patrick became the first non-American artist selected to feature on and in the accompanying exhibition catalogue.  

Here at home Patrick has received the University of Tasmania Foundation Graduate Award and been chosen to appear in the inaugural Tasmanian (Artist) Monograph series by Arts Tasmania.  Patrick has also contributed to the boards of State and National arts organisations such as the Visual Arts/Crafts Fund, Australia Council; Contemporary Art Tasmania (formerly CAST) and the Visual Arts and Design Panel, Arts Tasmania.  In 1985 Patrick was one of the founders of the Designer-Makers Co-operative, now know as Designed Objects Tasmania (DOT).

Patrick’s artworks can be found in public spaces such as the somewhat lonely and melancholy “Beaumaris Zoo” site, Queen’s Domain, Hobart; Mount Nelson’s Sustainability Learning Centre; The Mercury Newspaper’s head office, Hobart; the Royal Hobart Hospital; the Hobart City Mall and in public and private collections including the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Hobart; the Museum of Old and New Art [MONA], Berriedale; the Power House Museum, Sydney and the National Gallery of Australia, Canberra. (bio from www.hallison.com)

Photography ‘Pat Hall’ by Peter Whyte